Merchants from London and Exeter trading with Livorno in 1704: source transcript. Thursday, Nov 24 2022 


This contribution of mine is a simple transcription of a primary source useful for finding the names of merchants with business and family interests in Livorno. The printed booklet is available online on the platform ECCO (Eighteenth Century Collections Online) and its full title is: “The answer of the merchants-petitioners, and Trustees for the Factory at Legorn, To The Account of Damages, Laid to the charge of The Great Duke of Toscany, by Sir Alexander Rigby, Mr. Will. Shepard, and Mr. Will. Plowman: Together with Their reply, and The Merchants-Petitioners Second answer thereto. As also Divers Original Papers and Proofs; Deliver’d in Writing to Sir John Cooke, Judge Advocate, and John Pollexfen, Esq; The Delegates appointed by Her Majesty’s Special Command, to Hear what the Petitioners had to say; and to make Their Report thereupon. With several other Matters and Papers since come to Hand from Legorn.“, printed in 1704 in London. Unfortunately the ECCO platform is only available to selected Universities and libraries worldwide and not to the general public or freelance researchers like me, so when I had a chance to access it, I fully transcribed the following three parts which reveal the names of the people I am interested in:

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Non-catholic civil registers of Livorno (1818-1865) fully indexed. Saturday, Aug 31 2013 

The three index volumes

I’m pleased to announce the completion of the indexing process of the non-catholic civil registers of Livorno (1818-1865)!

The work took really a long time (almost a year) and a great effort but is now complete in its 15898 single entries that represent a total of 3628 family names. I believe that the registers for which these indexes were made are of the greatest importance for Livorno but also for a much larger audience given the fact that so many non-catholics were living in Livorno, coming from all over the world. Additionally these records include, and are composed mainly of, Jewish people. As everyone is aware of the importance of the Jewish community of Livorno, these records can depict the family networks of all these people for a period just short of 50 years across the 19th century.

If you didn’t follow the other posts about this subject, please take a few moments to read the introduction to these records. On the same page you will find the links to access the indexes. ( EzVN8HdtkCV5rZrTWIbp )

Livorno Non-Catholic Marriages’ index (1818-1865) completed! Saturday, Aug 3 2013 

The Livorno’s Non-Catholic Civil Marriages’ Index (1818-1865) has been completed in the past few days; after the initial release of several sections, it is now fully published online. The index is comprised of 3288 single entries, representing 1644 different marriages, and a little over 1000 different family names.

Some more information on this source can be found here (also accessible from the blog homepage), otherwise you can  directly access the

Marriages’ Index.

Livorno Non-Catholic indexes (1818-1865) silently updating… Sunday, Dec 2 2012 

The Livorno’s Non-Catholic Civil Births’ Index (1818-1865) has been silently updated in the past few days, after the initial release of letters A-E, and is now fully published online. The index is comprised of 6666 single entries and a little over 1000 different family names.

Some more information on this source can be found here (also accessible from the blog homepage), otherwise you can  directly access the Births’ Index.

Livorno Non-Catholic Birth, Marriage, and Death indexes (1818-1865) are online. Monday, Nov 19 2012 

For the first time this fundamental source for the history of Livorno is being gradually published on this blog. The first batch of the Births’ Index is already online and it includes letters A through E totalling a little more than 2000 individuals.

The plan is to publish the totality of the three indexes (Births, Marriages and Deaths) in batches like the first one, a few letters at a time. Once completed, it will be a priceless source covering nearly 50 years (1818-1865) of  existence of the non-catholic minorities in Livorno. All births, marriages and deaths of any individual professing a non-catholic faith were recorded and indexed in these civil registers, including but not limited to: Jews, Dutchmen, Germans, English, Huguenots, Waldensians, Muslims, Orthodox Greeks, Protestants, et al.

Some more information on this source can be found here (also accessible from the blog homepage). There you will find answers to the following questions and, of course, the links to access the indexes:

– What are the “non-catholic indexes” of Livorno?

– What information do they include?

– What information can I expect to find in a full act?

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If you already know the answers you can click directly on the Births’ Indexes.

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UPDATE (Nov. 21st, 2012): Added letters F – G – H – I – J – K

Shame! The “English Cemetery” of Pisa. Sunday, Sep 2 2012 

If you happen to visit the city of Pisa by bus, chances are that your bus parks at the large bus parking area on Via Pietrasantina, a few hundred yards away from the world heritage site of Piazza dei Miracoli, where thousands of tourists visit the leaning tower everyday.
In this case, unfortunately, you might also happen to walk down Via Pietrasantina to reach the famous square, risking at the same time your life and (more…)

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