Livorno Non-Catholic Marriages’ index (1818-1865) completed! Saturday, Aug 3 2013 

The Livorno’s Non-Catholic Civil Marriages’ Index (1818-1865) has been completed in the past few days; after the initial release of several sections, it is now fully published online. The index is comprised of 3288 single entries, representing 1644 different marriages, and a little over 1000 different family names.

Some more information on this source can be found here (also accessible from the blog homepage), otherwise you can  directly access the

Marriages’ Index.

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New Section: Livorno/Leghorn in Quotes Thursday, Nov 1 2012 

As already done for the Old English Cemetery, I created a new page with a collection of quotes from travellers’ accounts regarding the city of Livorno (or Leghorn). The new section will be evolving with time, as new quotes are found from the travel journals of the 17th-19th centuries. The page is accessible from the main blog page, or by clicking the next link:

-> Leghorn/Livorno in Quotes <-

New Blog Section: The Old English Cemetery of Livorno in Images Thursday, Aug 23 2012 

A whole new section has just been added to the blog’s page about the Old English Cemetery of Livorno:

 ♦ The Old English Cemetery in Images ♦

The new page consists, for now, of a few sub-sections rich of images related to the cemetery:

I plan to add more pictures and themed-sections in the next future. Enjoy!

New Blog Section: the Greek-Orthodox Nation of Livorno Tuesday, Apr 3 2012 

A whole new page with several sub-sections has just been added to the blog’s main menu:

The Greek-Orthodox Nation of Livorno

Fellow historian Mathieu Grenet provided me with several documents he compiled during his research trips in Livorno and Greece. The lists added to the page are a first nucleus of sources regarding the Greek Nation of Livorno:

Most of the primary and secondary sources used to establish these lists were originally in Greek and thus quite unaccessible to the majority of researchers. For the first time, they are available on this blog, transcribed in the latin alphabet and translated in English.

On Tobias Smollett’s grave(s)… Reality or poetic licence? Thursday, Mar 29 2012 

Tobias Smollett’s grave in the Old English Cemetery of Livorno has always sparked people’s interest: numerous visitors were attracted to the English Cemetery just to see the tomb of the great Scottish writer and historian. Some of them even took pieces of marble off as souvenirs, or left messages inscribed on the monument. Many travellers left short accounts on their visit to the cemetery and to Smollett’s tomb. Later on, the apparent mystery of its wrong inscription led to a written confrontation between Consul Montgomery Carmichael and Col. Buchan Telfer on the pages of The Times. More recently, after WWII, some concerned readers wrote to the Editor of The Times to denounce the state of neglect of the cemetery and of Smollett’s grave. The newspaper even published two pictures of the burial ground, of which one portrayed the writer’s monument at that time (1953).

The following picture shows (more…)

The Old English Cemetery in Quotes: a new page. Friday, Feb 24 2012 

For a long time I have been collecting brief excerpts or longer citations regarding the Old English Cemetery of Livorno. Many of these have the power of giving us a glance of what it was like in the past by describing in colourful detail its vegetation, or the railings and low wall enclosing it, or the magic and melancholy atmosphere that could be felt while wandering there, or some of the white marble monuments of all shapes, with their inscriptions in many different languages…  These passages were written by people visiting it during a day off at Livorno’s harbour waiting to sail to some other places. Others came just to see the famous tombs of Smollett and Horner, or to look for the grave of an acquaintance or of some other person they particularly respected… Some of them fell in love with it and would even dream of dying in the surroundings so they could be buried in such a wonderful garden, while some others compared it to other cemeteries, or noted its uniqueness in Italy or its age. Certain writers depicted Livorno as the Italian ‘Babel’; it was populated with merchants of all tongues, mariners and pirates, noblemen and their courts passing through on their way back to Florence, and consumptive gentlemen hoping the sea breeze would make their health better.

Here’s one of these excerpts:

Piero Sraffa, M. H. Dobb, The Works and Correspondence of David Ricardo, 10, 1955, 321-322.

Letter, Thursday 24 Oct.r Pisa [1822]

(…) We also saw the English Burying Ground in which we were very much (more…)

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