Non-catholic civil registers of Livorno (1818-1865) fully indexed. Saturday, Aug 31 2013 

The three index volumes

I’m pleased to announce the completion of the indexing process of the non-catholic civil registers of Livorno (1818-1865)!

The work took really a long time (almost a year) and a great effort but is now complete in its 15898 single entries that represent a total of 3628 family names. I believe that the registers for which these indexes were made are of the greatest importance for Livorno but also for a much larger audience given the fact that so many non-catholics were living in Livorno, coming from all over the world. Additionally these records include, and are composed mainly of, Jewish people. As everyone is aware of the importance of the Jewish community of Livorno, these records can depict the family networks of all these people for a period just short of 50 years across the 19th century.

If you didn’t follow the other posts about this subject, please take a few moments to read the introduction to these records. On the same page you will find the links to access the indexes. ( EzVN8HdtkCV5rZrTWIbp )

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Livorno Non-Catholic Marriages’ index (1818-1865) completed! Saturday, Aug 3 2013 

The Livorno’s Non-Catholic Civil Marriages’ Index (1818-1865) has been completed in the past few days; after the initial release of several sections, it is now fully published online. The index is comprised of 3288 single entries, representing 1644 different marriages, and a little over 1000 different family names.

Some more information on this source can be found here (also accessible from the blog homepage), otherwise you can  directly access the

Marriages’ Index.

Shame! The “English Cemetery” of Pisa. Sunday, Sep 2 2012 

If you happen to visit the city of Pisa by bus, chances are that your bus parks at the large bus parking area on Via Pietrasantina, a few hundred yards away from the world heritage site of Piazza dei Miracoli, where thousands of tourists visit the leaning tower everyday.
In this case, unfortunately, you might also happen to walk down Via Pietrasantina to reach the famous square, risking at the same time your life and (more…)

Anonymous writer identified: a new source about Tuscan life in the 1840s Thursday, Mar 8 2012 

Few days ago I stumbled upon a curious and intriguing citation on the “Church of England Magazine” issue for October 31st, 1857, p.287:

“NOTICE OF BOOKS:

AMONG the books which have lately reached us are the following: 

The Bow in the Cloud a Memoir of MEH. By her Sister, London: Hatchard, 1857. This is the account of a young lady who lived, for the most part of her life, and ultimately died, abroad. The pity we feel for those, whose lot it is to dwell far from their fatherland, augments the interest with which we peruse such records. The disadvantages, social, political, and religious, of the continent, are obstacles and stumbling-blocks which to many have proved of ruinous effect. And yet, in spite of them, God has often been pleased to cherish the spiritual life of his people, and render such sojourners the means of usefulness to those around them. Thus it seems to have been with the subject of this memoir. An accident in early life destroyed the sight of one eye; and subsequent ill-health was a continued chastening from the Father of her spirit. She was brought into believing union with the Saviour; and the copious extracts from her journal depict very touchingly the working of her inner life. Her last hours were peace; for Christ sustained her; and she sleeps (having died in her 27th year, a few weeks after her father, and a few months before her mother) with her parents in the British cemetery at Leghorn, in sure and certain hope of joyful resurrection. We cheerfully give our testimony to the value of this little volume; and we think it likely to be acceptable and useful, especially to young persons.

I was not yet sure whether this information on the author and her family was true or invented and I went (more…)

Diplomats buried at the Old English Cemetery of Livorno – Part 1 Friday, Feb 3 2012 

Sir John Dick and his mysterious mausoleum

The choice of this beautiful portrait by Gilbert Stuart of Sir John Dick (1721-1804), British Consul at Livorno from 1754 to 1776, was inspired by the strange fact (as some scholars and historians argued) that, in the Old English Cemetery of this place, one cannot find any burial of the several English consuls who lived here since the beginning of the 17th century, until the cemetery was finally closed in 1840 (we will be talking about the New English Cemetery in a specific article sometime later). This “absence” of consular and diplomatic graves is indeed a fact but, as I will show in the next parts of this article, it’s still not entirely true. Sir John Dick himself, or more precisely his grave, is also protagonist of another strange mystery (more…)

The Chamber of Commerce of Livorno: a brief outlook on its origins. Wednesday, Aug 31 2011 

As Vittorio Marchi and Ugo Canessa tell us in their massive 4-volume book about the history of the Chamber of Commerce of Livorno (*), an ancestor of this institution can be identified in the Deputation formed by the city Governor, the Consuls and at least four merchants, created in 1642 by the Grand Duke of Tuscany. This Deputation is then reformed in 1692 and evolves into the so called Deputation of Commerce or Board of Commerce in 1717. At this time the chosen Deputees were eight, half of them Tuscan, half foreigners: (more…)

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